Floods Displace 73, 379, Injures 277 Persons in Kogi, 21 Other States – Presidency

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The Presidency has confirmed that floods have displaced 73,379 and injured 277 others in Kogi, FCT, Niger, Edo and 18 others states since January this year till date.

A presidential spokesman, Garba Shehu, who disclosed this in a statement, said the floods and heavy rain had also killed 115 persons and left about 37, 633 houses destroyed or severely damaged.

Shehu, in the statement released in Abuja on Tuesday, said that figures were in latest data from relevant government ministries, departments and agencies.

He said since the beginning of the year, flooding had been reported in Kogi, Lagos, Yobe, Borno, Taraba, Adamawa, Edo, Delta, Niger, Plateau, Benue, Ebonyi, Anambra, Bauchi, Gombe, Kano, Jigawa, Zamfara, Kebbi, Sokoto, Imo and Abia States as well as the Federal Capital Territory, affecting 508,721 people.

President Muhammadu Buhari , according to Shehu, has been receiving regular updates on the flood situation and extended condolences to all the families affected by the recent incidents.

Buhari promised that the Federal Government would continue to provide the needed emergency assistance to individuals and communities impacted by the disaster.

He also invited other public-spirited individuals and organisations to support hundreds of thousands of people in need of urgent help in the affected communities.

He said these tragic events had brought to fore the need for states and local governments to step up their level of preparedness in handling emergencies which remained a shared responsibility with the government at the centre.

He also said the government would continue to monitor the situation very closely to work more with states and affected communities to reduce the impact of the disaster, provide resources and improve response and recovery efforts.

Buhari urged inhabitants of flood-prone areas to always adhere to the early warning advisories as issued by the organisations saddled with climate monitoring and disaster management.


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